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Who(m) Do We Trust? 1 2 3


We live in a world that has a flood of information resources. How do we decide which information is true? How do we sort out what is most reliable? Let's look at some handy tools and ideas that help to make sense of it all.

Essential Question: "How do you know information is true?"


~ Dennis Harter and Justin Medved at Curriculum 2.0 Wiki


Icebreaker: Two Truths and a Lie

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z



Wikispaces for Educators





In the Beginning . . . as a baby . . .


Not Trusting Enough vs. Overly Trusting


Skepticism: Caveat Emptor: "Let the Buyer Beware"


Hands-on Trust Activities


  • Trust Walk
  • Trust Fall

Activity: Things We Trust List

Activity: Things We Don't Trust List

Activity: Things We Question List


Hoaxes or Not?




Credibility



Propoganda & Advertising


Logical Fallacies


Scientific Method


Expert Source (Authoritative)

*

Democratic Approach - Reputation



Point of View: Perspective



Bias


Omission / Commission (The Art of Lying)


Stephen Downes: Principles for Evaluating Websites


More Evaluating Information Resources (feel free to add to the list)



So what is a person to do?



"Trust, but Verify"

~ President Ronald Reagan


  • Authoritative & Democratic

  • Check source

  • Check Multiple sources

  • "If it seems too good to be true, it probably is" . . . look closer before leaping. Don't Jump.


Internet Safety Sites

**RSU 10 Digital Citizenship*


Wikispaces for Educators




Debrief


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ISTE NETS:

  • Evaluate the accuracy, relevance, appropriateness, comprehensiveness, and bias of electronic information sources.


Maine Learning Results:

  • Evaluate information for accuracy, currency, and possible bias.
  • Distinguish between facts encountered in documents, narratives, and other sources and the generalizations or interpretations a person draws concerning those facts.


Trust Quotes
Trust Quotes 2

From Center for Media Literacy:


CML’s Five Key Questions
Deconstruction

1. Who created this message?

2. What creative techniques are used to attract my attention?

3. How might different people understand this message
differently?

4. What values, lifestyles and points of view are represented in, or
omitted from, this message?

5. Why is this message being sent?

CML’s Five Core Concepts
1. All media messages are constructed.

2. Media messages are constructed using a creative language
with its own rules.

3. Different people experience the same media message
differently.

4. Media have embedded values and points of view.

5. Most media messages are organized to gain profit and/or
power.